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At Home in MUDE

The Kitchen - Image courtesy of Carlos Porfirio

The Kitchen - Image courtesy of Carlos Porfirio
The Stair in MUDE's exhibition space - Image courtesy of Carlos Porfirio

The Stair in MUDE's exhibition space - Image courtesy of Carlos Porfirio
The Day Bed - Image courtesy of Carlos Porfirio

The Day Bed - Image courtesy of Carlos Porfirio
Home from Home - Image courtesy of Carlos Porfirio

Home from Home - Image courtesy of Carlos Porfirio

1 May 2011
by Lauren McKirdy

Last week I was in Lisbon with Carl Turner Architects to install Home from Home at MUDE. We spent a nervous Tuesday morning waiting for the van to arrive from London and then unloading it outside MUDE with lots of onlookers excited to see what we were bringing to the museum.

After a couple of days of Carl and Alicja putting finishing touches to the pieces we held an opening at the museum. People were instantly engaging with the pieces, drawing images of their own homes on the postcards, reading the housing publications, relaxing in the front room and even sleeping on the day bed!

A Guide to Home from Home:

The Front Room

The front room module addresses the iconic representation of the façade and opens up around the bay window to allow a conversation space for the public to enjoy. A typically British mantelpiece acts as a focal point for the display of ornaments and family photos, in a room that is traditionally an area for guests to visit and be impressed.

The Kitchen Table

The kitchen table is often said to be the ‘heart’ of a British home. In CTA’s version hinged elements expand the table surface to create an area for people to gather and picnic in. This informal space is designed to allow a sense of feeling at home within the museum, and to explore typical British household objects.

The Stair

Not usually considered a room as such, this in-between space is examined as a void that becomes a tactile hideaway for children to explore and enjoy. The subtle play on scale gives the module a distorted quality that adults too will be intrigued by as they sit on the top stair to admire the view through the loft hatch.  

The Commode

The commode – an interpretation of the British lavatory or ‘loo’ - provides a more isolated experience within the installation. Designed around individual cubical dimensions, it is a quiet space for contemplation and reflects typical materials that may be used in a British home.

The Day Bed

The day bed plays on notions of comfort and relaxation. As technical equipment becomes more portable, the way we use our homes is changing, allowing rooms that were once strictly private to become open and flexible. The day bed also examines the materials used in British homes, with a mattress composed from lambs-wool insulation and the bed’s four-poster elements echoing the refinement in structurally engineered timber housing frames.

You can visit the Home from Home installation at MUDE Museum in Lisbon and keep an eye on our blog for more updates on its progress.

  Home from Home was commissioned by British Council and The Architecture Foundation as part of the New Architects Exchange Programme.

Category
British Council Project

Location
Portugal

Tags
Architecture
Design
Museum