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Home Economics Book Launch

 © The Spaces

© The Spaces

 © The Spaces

© The Spaces

 © The Spaces

© The Spaces

 © The Spaces

© The Spaces

Home Economics curator Jack Self with editor of The Spaces Malaika Byng at the London launch of the book © The Spaces

© The Spaces

Home Economics curator Jack Self with editor of The Spaces Malaika Byng at the London launch of the book

1 August 2016
by Kate Le Versha

Last month saw the launch of Home Economics, the book accompanying the exhibition at the British Pavilion during the 15th Venice Architecture Biennale.  

Complementing the exhibition, the eponymously titled book Home Economics proposes alternative futures for the home and asks us to re-examine how we live, through the lens of time. More than an exhibition catalogue, though, the book takes the proposals within the show to a rational and sometimes abstract conclusion while in-depth critical commentary builds on the key ideas behind Home Economics.

As in the show, each design proposition has been divided according to how much time we spend in the home (Hours, Days, Months, Years, Decades) and addresses ‘different facets of how we live today – from whether we can prevent property speculation, to whether sharing can be a form of luxury rather than a compromise.’

Featuring essays by leading architects, critics and housing experts including Eddie Blake, Tom Dyckhoff and Mark Cousins, the book re-writes the brief for contemporary living. As the publisher and digital magazine The Spaces comments; 'This book, like the exhibition itself, is a truly collaborative work that engages with the world beyond architecture – including contributions by artists, fashion designers, photographers and critical writers – to inspire us to reconsider the spaces we spend time in, and our lives, anew.'

Authored by Home Economics curators Jack Self, Shumi Bose and Finn Williams, published by The Spaces with REAL Foundation, the book was designed by London studio OK-RM and features exhibition photography by Thomas Adank with the contribution of Johann Besse.

The book can be bought at the Home Economics exhibition at the British Pavilion in Venice, which is open until 27 November 2016, and online with The Spaces.